Egyptian Protests Worsen

The Story:

Lost Angeles Times’ “Egyptian protests intensify; demonstrators battle with police” essentially lists another of Cairo’s days of division: police and protesters physically battle on public streets and opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei hid after being attacked by a water cannon. Additionally, reports say President Hosni Mubarak would address the nation. The Egyptian outcry follow protests in Tunisia, which also were purposed in tearing down Tunisia’s government. Egyptian demonstrators have called for an end to Mubarak’s government, arguing its dishonorable, fiscally unfair, and totalitarian. “Leave, leave, Mubarak, the plane awaits you,” they declared, apropos Tusisians’ ouster-by-plane of Tunisian autocrat Zine el-Abidine ben Ali, whose expulsion has launched many rallies throughout the Arab world. Egypt’s goverment has responded with force by firing tear gas, concussion grenades, shutting down the Internet and blocking news stations from broadcasting.

My Take:

There are three reasons this story is newsworthy. Firstly, Egyptians across the globe would have an inherent desire, almost a right, to know what current events occur in their homeland. Secondly, no nation is ever truly isolated; current events, especially protests, affect the rest of the world. Americans, Russians and Brits, for example, ought to engage in international affairs, be them good or bad, in preparation for rippling effects. Thirdly, this story’s major appealing element is chaos. When chaos occurs, something is in disorder. People, living in a predominantly orderly world, are interested in chaos, and, hopefully, restoration: seeing chaos made right.

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